Layout Image

There are plenty of things that make your role as leader difficult – troublesome employees, small budgets, technology problems, demanding customers. But, if you’re having problems within your company and you’re having trouble pin-pointing the cause, there might be one other place you should look. Try taking a good look in the mirror, because sometimes the problem is actually you.

Nothing is more damaging, or frustrating, than when you get in your own way. So check out these three forms of self-sabotage and make sure you aren’t behind your workplace woes.

Avoiding Taking Responsibility
Admitting you were wrong, taking responsibility, and apologizing is hard for anyone to do, and it can be especially difficult for leaders because there often people who look to them for guidance. Your reputation is a valuable asset.  Not taking responsibility for your own actions is one of the biggest forms of self-sabotage and could have a significant impact on how you are viewed as a leader. Read More→

This week on Peak Performer’s Life, Walter Bond discusses the famous “I have a dream” Martin Luther King Jr. speech and the importance of being committed to your dream. Dr. King’s actions lined up with his dreams, so in order to achieve success, your daily actions must also line up with your dream.

According to Walter:
“Before you get committed to your dream, it’s going to be impossible to stay focused over time to make the dream come true.”

How do your actions show your commitment to your dream? How do you get other people to buy into your goal? Let us know in the comments section below.
Read More→

A Safety Net … or a Trap?

Express Employment Professionals recently released a white paper exploring government benefit programs and their impact on employment.

The paper seeks to answer four pressing questions:

  1. Are people abusing the disability insurance program?
  2. Are unemployment benefits prolonging unemployment?
  3. Are welfare benefits creating a “low-wage trap?”
  4. Have other programs become inefficient and counterproductive?

These questions have taken on new urgency as government budgets tighten and as the nation’s labor force participation rate (LFPR) has remained too low for too long, even after the economic recovery began in 2009. The LFPR is at lows not seen since the Carter presidency. Is it possible that programs designed to fix these problems are actually making them worse? Read More→

In October, we asked what you anticipated to be your company’s biggest roadblocks to finishing strong in 2014. According to the results, with 19% of the votes, “outside influences (i.e. regulations, competition, economy, etc.)” is weighing heaviest on the minds of business leaders as we head into the end of the year. In second place, 16% of respondents said “lack of skilled workers” would be their biggest roadblock, followed by “insufficient staff” at 14%.

The rest of the results are as follows:

  • Poor leadership (13%)
  • Turnover and retention issues (11%)
  • Disengaged workforce (11%)
  • Unclear goals (8%) Read More→

This week on Peak Performer’s Life, Walter Bond reveals three simple things you can start doing today to help you get on your way to becoming  a peak performer. Simply put, before you can be an effective leader, you must first be able to “govern yourself.”

According to Walter:
“Be disciplined with your mind and what you think, because if you’re not thinking the right things, you’re not going to say the right things … you aren’t going to do the right things.”

How do you take your thoughts captive? What do you do to ensure you are first managing yourself before you lead others? Let us know in the comments section below. Read More→

Are You Your Own Worst Boss?

Late nights. Hard deadlines. Stressful weekends. Negative reinforcement. These are all red flags that toxic leadership is at play; however, in many professionals’ instances, it’s not from their direct supervisor or boss—but themselves. Even the best leaders can be the worst self-leaders. Though you may be a positive, caring boss to your employees, are you a taskmaster-type boss with yourself?

Criticism

Handling criticism is just one aspect of growing up in this world. Learning how to have thick skin and let negativity roll off is a main driver of personal satisfaction in life. But, what if the criticism is coming from within? Everyone has heard the age old statement “I’m my own worst critic.” Usually, this is spoken with tongue-in-cheek and simply means that the person is a perfectionist with what they can control. In fact, constructive criticism is one of the best ways to cultivate personal growth. But negative criticism is vastly more apparent. Criticism brings a short-term solution to an existing problem. However, negative reinforcement can lead to long-term resentment. Over criticizing leads to stressful conditions in the work place, which in turn, can produce subpar performance. This is why good leaders try to use employee mistakes and issues as learning opportunities. But when it comes to the inner monologue, negativity can still run rampant, causing unneeded stress. According to the American Psychological Association, 77% of people regularly experience physical symptoms caused by stress. And of those who struggle with stress, they cited the number one cause as job pressure. Curb high stress and negativity by focusing on the long-term solution—positive, constructive criticism. Others are looking to you for guidance. Cut yourself some slack. Read More→

This week on Peak Performer’s Life, Walter Bond reveals three simple things you can start doing today to help you get on your way to becoming  a peak performer. Simply put, before you can be an effective leader, you must first be able to “govern yourself.”

According to Walter:
“Be disciplined with your mind and what you think, because if you’re not thinking the right things, you’re not going to say the right things … you aren’t going to do the right things.”

How do you take your thoughts captive? What do you do to ensure you are first managing yourself before you lead others? Let us know in the comments section below. Read More→

On this day, 135 years ago, columnist, humorist, actor, and social commentator Will Rogers was born in Oologah, OK (then Indian Territory). Through his keen eye and quick wit, Rogers dissected the most important issues of the day and shared insightful commentary on topics ranging from politics to Hollywood to the daily lives of regular people.

Rogers’ words are a part of his lasting legacy, so check out these inspirational quotes and think about how you can apply them to your daily life, both at work and at home.

  • Even if you’re on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there.
  • Live in such a way that you would not be ashamed to sell your parrot to the town gossip.
  • People’s minds are changed through observation and not through argument.
  • Don’t let yesterday use up too much of today.
  • Lettin’ the cat out of the bag is a lot easier than puttin’ it back in.
  • Chaotic action is preferable to orderly inaction.
  • Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
  • Worrying is like paying on a debt that may never come due.
  • The best way out of a difficulty is through it.
  • People who fly into a rage always make a bad landing.

What are some of your favorite Will Rogers quotes? Share them in the comments section below. Read More→

The iconic fall symbols are coming out of the woodwork, while people across North America begin to decorate their homes and offices with cornucopias, harvest moons, and warm colors. But to truly get in the autumn mood, try these five things to do this month!

National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month
Alzheimer’s is a debilitating disease that many of us have been affected by through friends or family. In fact, more than 5 million Americans and approximately 500,000 Canadians are living with the disease. One way you and your team can make a difference is by honoring one of the millions of caregivers who have devoted time and energy to help those afflicted by the disease by having your team send a personal tribute to someone you know or through this site. Read More→

If you’re not constantly innovating and staying on the cutting edge of your industry, the competition will very quickly pass you by. In today’s highly competitive business environment, staying ahead of consumers’ changing tastes is the key to building and maintaining a successful company. But, what happens when you hit a roadblock and the new ideas seem to stop coming? It may be time to change the way you’re seeking out that next big innovation.

Flip the Flops
In 1968, a 3M Company scientist had been working on developing a super-strong adhesive, but due to miscalculations along the way, he inadvertently created a reusable, pressure sensitive adhesive. The new “low-tack” adhesive formula really didn’t have much value until 1974 when another 3M colleague had the idea to use it to anchor a bookmark in his choir hymnal, and at that moment the idea for Post-It Notes was born. Read More→